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Planned Parenthood’s Cobalt Blue Sex Education

May 16th, 2011

By Chuck Rogér

American philosopher Thomas Sowell wrote that “the vision of the anointed [has] achieved a sacrosanct status, hermetically sealed off from the contaminating influence of facts.”[1]  There are few places in America with as dense a concentration of anointed critters as Santa Fe, New Mexico.  The city is famous for its art and food scenes, pueblo-style architecture, and skies rendered deep blue by a seven-thousand-foot elevation and crisp, clean air.  But something decidedly unclean is happening in Santa Fe.

The venue is Monte del Sol Charter School.  An eighteen-year-old demonstrates the use of condoms in class.  The girl’s expertise comes courtesy of Planned Parenthood’s Peer Education Program.

Santa Fe Planned Parenthood “health educator” Denise Jennings, who wants to “normalize sex,” trains teens to train other teens in “the five circles of sexuality.”  According to a local newspaper, Jennings tours schools, teen trainees in tow, teaching about “sensuality, intimacy, sexual identity, sexual health and reproduction, and sexualization (…using sex to manipulate others).”

In class, a student asks about the “right time to have sex.”  A teen trainee responds that people must be “emotionally and physically prepared to accept the consequences and accept responsibility” for having sex — no mention of the inadvisability of children having sex at all.  A Monte del Sol health teacher appreciates that Planned Parenthood conducts the sex discussions.  After all, “they are the experts and they have props.”

Planned Parenthood is shifting its “expert” skills into high-gear. Sex Ed Camps and Santa Fe-style programs are multiplying.  Traditional America is under siege by ideologues breeding if-it-feels-good-do-it narcissists.  The Peer Education Program illustrates what happens when mission-oriented progressives take action.  Thomas Sowell dubbed such ideologues, “the anointed.”[2]
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  1. Mont D. Law
    May 16th, 2011 at 15:25 | #1

    http://www.santafenewmexican.com/Local%20News/Sex-ed-gets-less–weird-

    “We’re trying to normalize sex,” said Denise Jennings, Planned Parenthood in Santa Fe health educator, who trains the students and is present when they visit the schools.”

    “We know kids don’t always go to adults to discuss sex,” she said. “They will go online or to friends who may not always have the most accurate information.”

    Confident and composed, she told the Monte del Sol students about the five circles of sexuality: sensuality, intimacy, sexual identity, sexual health and reproduction, and sexualization (in the Planned Parenthood parlance, using sex to manipulate others).

    The students responded with comments as well as questions about IUDs (intrauterine devices), female condoms and the difference between withholding sex from your partner and having a lower sex drive than your partner.

    “We’re taking it more seriously because it’s one of us talking,” 12th-grader Leah Tatom said of the class. “It’d be pretty weird if John was talking about this to us.”

    Ignorance is never a good idea. At any age.

  2. nerdygirl
    May 16th, 2011 at 18:24 | #2

    “Planned Parenthood types in cobalt-blue Santa Fe and throughout red-white-and-blue America are cheapening America’s young — parents be damned. ”

    Yeah. I am not cheapened because I had pre-martial sex. However, the idea that pre-martial sex is inherently “cheapening” may have something to do with why some teens don’t talk to their parents about sex.

  3. Amy
    May 16th, 2011 at 22:28 | #3

    Heaven forbid that teens should discuss something as important as sexual intimacy with the people who love them best!

  4. Ruth
    May 16th, 2011 at 23:02 | #4

    @nerdygirl
    Are you proud of your behavior?

  5. Mont D. Law
    May 17th, 2011 at 10:53 | #5

    [Heaven forbid that teens should discuss something as important as sexual intimacy with the people who love them best!]

    But teens as a rule don’t discuss it with their parents. Are you suggesting if there is no sex education in schools teen will suddenly reverse course & turn to their parents?

    [Are you proud of your behavior?]

    Oh judgmental questions – a sure fire way to encourage open communication.

  6. May 17th, 2011 at 12:57 | #6

    @Mont D. Law Teens in good homes with good family relationships do indeed discuss sex with their parents. But school can teach biology of sex and leave it at that without promoting everything deviant, and tell the teens that sex should be reserved for marriage rather than giving one’s body away for entertainment to whoever they happen to like at the moment.

  7. nerdygirl
    May 17th, 2011 at 15:16 | #7

    @Ruth
    Uh, WUT? No. srs. Proud of having sex? Are you proud of banging your husband?

  8. Mont D. Law
    May 17th, 2011 at 16:52 | #8

    [Teens in good homes with good family relationships do indeed discuss sex with their parents.]

    This is a fact free statement. How many teens? Which families? What are the teen pregnancy rates in these families?

    [But school can teach biology of sex and leave it at that without promoting everything deviant, and tell the teens that sex should be reserved for marriage rather than giving one’s body away for entertainment to whoever they happen to like at the moment.]

    Many states can & do teach exactly that. These are the states with the highest teen pregnancy rates. The states with the lowest teen pregnancy rates do not teach that. Exceptions to this rule are the 3 states with the largest Mormon populations (Hey Leo). So unless you can find a way to turn everybody into Mormons, the path to discouraging teen pregnancy seem pretty clear.

  9. Ruth
    May 17th, 2011 at 20:51 | #9

    What does “No. srs.” mean?

    I was referring to fornication.
    Are you proud of it?

  10. May 18th, 2011 at 07:18 | #10

    @Mont D. Law Oh, so general statements made by those pushing sex-education are not “fact free,” yet mine is? Let’s put it this way, every family I have known over the past 35 years I’ve been married do indeed talk with their children about sex. I’ve never run into any kids who were ignorant about it. And I know some whose daughters did indeed get pregnant but not for lack of knowledge.

    Stats about pregnancy rates are developed by those pushing the SEICUS/PP sex-education agenda; and I’m supposed to trust they are unbiased?

  11. nerdygirl
    May 18th, 2011 at 08:05 | #11

    @Ruth
    It means. No. Seriously. Because that question was so inane that it didn’t deserve to be responded with in proper english.

    So. No. SRS. ARE YOU PROUD OF BANGING YOUR HUSBAND?

  12. Heidi
    May 18th, 2011 at 08:13 | #12

    @Ruth
    “I was referring to fornication.
    Are you proud of it?”

    What kind of question is that? Fornication? Who uses that word, really? Anyhow, I suspect nerdygirl is neither “proud” NOR ashamed. Not everyone believes that premarital sex is a terrible soul-destroying event. Guess what? I too had premarital sex and guess what else? GASP! I liked it! Sex is a natural and normal part of the human experience. Not everyone is a virgin until his or her wedding night and it doesn’t make someone a bad person. I agree with Mont D. Law. What a judgmental question. Are you implying that nerdygirl should feel guilty and ashamed? Does it somehow make her less of a person?

  13. Deb
    May 18th, 2011 at 11:47 | #13

    @Mont D. Law

    “But teens as a rule don’t discuss it with their parents.”

    This, too is a fact free statement. How many teens? What percentage? Which families? What are the teen pregnancy rates in these families?

  14. Deb
    May 18th, 2011 at 11:50 | #14

    @Mont D. Law

    “Many states can & do teach exactly that. These are the states with the highest teen pregnancy rates.”

    Yes, these studies have been mentioned here before. Correlation does not prove causation.

  15. Ruth
    May 18th, 2011 at 14:09 | #15

    @nerdygirl
    Not being ashamed of fornication means that the link between sex, love, and God has been damaged or broken.

  16. Ruth
    May 18th, 2011 at 14:14 | #16

    @Heidi
    Whose “likes” would you propose as a foundation for morality?
    Not far down that road comes the point at which the biggest person, or the one who is best armed, decides what is right and wrong.

  17. Mont D. Law
    May 18th, 2011 at 14:57 | #17

    [“But teens as a rule don’t discuss it with their parents.”

    This, too is a fact free statement. How many teens? What percentage? Which families? What are the teen pregnancy rates in these families?]

    http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/parents/136?task=view

    [Stats about pregnancy rates are developed by those pushing the SEICUS/PP sex-education agenda; and I’m supposed to trust they are unbiased?]

    These stats are from the CDC. Are you suggesting that the CDC is producing bias information to support SEICUS/PP sex-education agenda?

    http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/TeenPregnancy/StateInfo.html

    How about the University of Pittsburgh? or Pen State? They are publishing bias studies to support SEICUS/PP sex-education agenda?

    http://www.prevention.psu.edu/pubs/docs/absp2_99.pdf

    Look here is one from Britain, are they releasing bias studies too?

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/6927733.stm

    Major public universities and the Centers for Disease control are publishing studies that are bias? To support an outcome that doesn’t work? I am sorry but this is not very credible.

    Or are you arguing that any study that disagrees with you is bias?

    [Yes, these studies have been mentioned here before. Correlation does not prove causation.]

    No it doesn’t – but correlation can and has been established.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080319151225.htm

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/03/24/us-teen-pregnancies-idUSTON47250120080324

    But assuming you discount these studies what is your explanation for the discrepancy?

  18. May 18th, 2011 at 15:53 | #18

    Seventeen Magazine – yeah, there’s a bastion of morality – NOT! that is a magazine which encourages all things sexual, and that is supposed to be unbiased? And what kind of girls reading that would respond to those sorts of surveys?

    Notice your CDC is about birth rates vs pregnancy rates. So the correlation to sex-ed has nothing to do with it, rather it appears other factors are involved; highest birth rates may be a result of lack of birth control, not lack of education. Lower birth rates may be due to more money for abortions, not more sex-education.

    Universities are notorious bastions of liberals, so any survey about sexual morality from them has to be taken with a grain of salt. Again, how many people surveyed? What sort of people would respond to that type of survey? Usually those who are self-focused and want people to know all about their sexual lives. The people I hang out with would never have responded to those types of surveys.

    And it would be interesting to know what standards they use to determine whether a program is working. How do you measure such a thing as whether abstinence programs work? Empirical evidence has shown a dramatic increase in sexual promiscuity among teens since “sex education” began being taught.

    I see lots of “might be” in your last two studies. Again, when you survey only a particular type of people – the type of people would bother to respond to such surveys – then you will get the results you want.

    Sort of like the issue of so-called man-made global warming. All the media and other studies “proving” it because of the government money involved, or other agendas (such as forcing the use of dangerous curly bulbs, etc). It’s all a hoax to promote an agenda, just like the agenda to promote sex-instruction classes in public schools.

    But then, I don’t have enough faith to trust these sorts of “studies” – I tend to observe real life in the people around me for the past 59 years.

  19. nerdygirl
    May 18th, 2011 at 19:24 | #19

    @Ruth
    You still haven’t answered if your proud of banging your husband (or are you ashamed?). But SRS. Thats quite reaching. Particularly seeing as how you know absolutely nothing about me beyond whats typed here. But yet you assume that somehow I don’t understand love, or how emotional sex can be.

    As far as God goes, that relationship is between me and God.

    But hey, you kinda illustrated the mentality that just might cause teens to decide to not talk about sex. So THX.

  20. Deb
    May 18th, 2011 at 19:27 | #20

    @Mont D. Law

    First, the Seventeen study: “Fifty-one percent of teens (61 percent of females; 42 percent of males) had discussed with their parents “how to know when you are ready to have sex.”

    1 in 2 kids are talking to their parents about sex. Your statement: “But teens as a rule don’t discuss it with their parents” is a stretch. *Half* of the kids discussing sex with their parents is “not talking to them as a rule” according to you? And we still don’t know the particular family situations of the children involved in this study.

    Family situations play an incredible part in which parents discuss intercourse with their children. What percentage of these households were single parent? If single parent, which were head by mothers and which by fathers? Were step-parents involved and could that possibly play into the lack of desire to talk to parents? What religions (if any) were the children polled? Of those who said they were religious, how frequent was their church attendance? What was the prevailing familial attitude towards marital sex versus non-marital sex and did that show correlation with those children who spoke to their parents?

    This particular piece from the study was very interesting in light of family make-up:

    “Father-daughter discussions about sexuality, while relatively infrequent, still outnumber father-son discussions regarding sexuality”

    Are fathers even present in the homes of the children being polled? Why are boys less likely to discuss sex with a parent than girls, on average? Who is present in the home matters to the outcome of this study.

  21. Ruth
    May 19th, 2011 at 00:12 | #21

    @nerdygirl
    Until you commit yourself to one loving man for as long as you both shall live, in obedience to God’s holy ordinance, you will never experience what sex was meant to be.

  22. nerdygirl
    May 19th, 2011 at 19:41 | #22

    @Ruth
    Ah, but look at it this way. Obvs. the sex with my future husband will be that much better because I’ll have the experience to look back and be like “Holy crap, sex married and committed to God is tots better then pre-marital sex!”

    I get laid now, I get laid even better later. Congrats, you’ve just made my situation even more win-win then it already was.

  23. Ruth
    May 19th, 2011 at 22:55 | #23

    @nerdygirl
    May your situation, and that of your future husband and your tots, as well, always be win-win-win.

  24. May 20th, 2011 at 09:38 | #24

    @nerdygirl So if you do anything in life and found out later you can have it better in another way, that therefore justifies settling for less just so you can know how much better it is later?!?!? That is one of the most absurd and illogical arguments I’ve ever heard for justifying promiscuity.

  25. nerdygirl
    May 20th, 2011 at 20:08 | #25

    @Glenn E. Chatfield
    The beautiful thing about you Glenn, is your earnestness. You don’t pick up on snark well, but it’s okay cause you’re so earnest.

  26. May 21st, 2011 at 08:18 | #26

    @nerdygirl I guess I don’t “pick up on snark well” because I don’t employ it.

  27. nerdygirl
    May 21st, 2011 at 21:08 | #27

    @Glenn E. Chatfield
    Like I said. EARNEST.

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