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Suppressing the Christian World View, Step by Totalitarian Step…

March 31st, 2011

It seems the editors of Mississauga News Magazine are utterly incensed that the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board near Ontario, Canada would not allow a student to form an official Gay/Striaght Alliance club at one of their secondary schools:

The nerve! This is a human rights issue and the Catholic board is coming out — excuse the term — on the wrong side of the argument.

Yeah, yeah… How dare those bigoted, homophobic, hate-mongering Christians manage their own schools according to their own religious precepts?

The editors of the Mississauga News are not the only self-appointed culture police to swing into action:

from LifeSiteNews.com:
In response, NDP [New Democratic Party] education critic Rosario Marchese called on Premier Dalton McGuinty to force GSAs into the Catholic boards, and the homosexual lobby group Egale denounced the board and the authentically-Catholic group Courage in a March 22 open letter to the Ontario government.

Well then, how about this? What if that same Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board were to show that they are not ‘anti-gay’ in some other way?:

from LifeSiteNews.com:
At an equity conference next month, Ontario’s Dufferin-Peel Catholic school board will feature several homosexual activists including one gay magazine reporter who covered the 2010 Toronto Pride Parade, with video showing him gleefully interviewing various Pride participants, including men dressed in sado-masochistic thongs.

At one point in the video, the reporter lies down on the street as a man in drag simulates a sex act on him.  “This is the best Pride present ever.  I’m having a great Pride week,” says Michael Pihach, a reporter with Xtra!, “Canada’s gay and lesbian newspaper.”

(See video here. Warning: extremely offensive content.)

Do you think that would appease the gay-identity-politics thought gestapo of Mississauga? Can the sex radicals of our age ever be appeased? (Those are intended to be rhetorical questions, by the way…)

What the Catholic District School Board has succeeded in doing, however, is raise the ire of many of the Catholics of Dufferin-Peel:

“I can’t believe that the school board would bring such people to a conference.  I don’t understand it,” said Francis Rodrigues, a concerned local Catholic in Dufferin-Peel.  “I mean, it’s common sense.  We’re entrusting our children to these people and this is what they do.”

“I think it’s a scandal, pure and simple,” said Rodrigues. “I think that the bishops must intervene and try to save what’s left of the schools,” he added.

Sorry Frank, but when there’s a conflict between the values of the sex radiclas and the Church, we Christians are expected to kowtow. That’s just how it is. You’ll have to learn to follow the example of some of our Catholic friends Down Under:

from LifeSiteNews.com:
An Australian Catholic secondary school has withdrawn permission for an event featuring a former homosexual speaker at the school, saying the presenter is not in line with Christian values and that “the Catholic Church abhors all forms of homophobia.”

See? Some ‘Christians’ have learned how they’re supposed to behave if they want to get along in this brave new world of ours…

The world’s Christians have understandably begun to look desperately to their fellow Christians in America to hold the final line against the totalitarian movements arrayed against the Church. We may soon be the last place on Earth where freedom of religion truly thives. Of course, that will not be the case if the agents of politcal correctness have their way. They are absolutely determined to bring us into line the way they already have most of the Western World just as we are absolutely determined to preserve our freedoms.

Well, to loosely paraphrase a favorite saying of the Second amendment ‘fanatics’: If You Want Our Freedom of Conscience, Our Freedom to Worship as We Believe We Should, Our Freedom to Practice Our Religion – Openly and Without Fear of Reprisal, Our Freedom to Parent Our Own Children as We See Fit, or Any of Our Other Freedoms; Then You Can PRY Those Freedoms Out of Our Cold Dead Hands. (OK, that’s an ackward mix of metaphors, but you get my point…)

That’s my attitude, anyway.

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  1. Mont D. Law
    April 1st, 2011 at 16:10 | #1

    Catholic schools in Ontario are not private schools. They exist because they agreed to abide by provincial rules and standards, in return for status and funding. I’m pretty sure they are going to end up with a Gay/Straight Alliance. Anyone who doesn’t like public school can pay to go private. My Grandmother was horrified that they allowed Catholics to attend public school at all. But because they were public schools & she couldn’t afford private my Aunt Glady married a Catholic (twice). It was the state’s refusal to indulge her religious prejudice that ended anti-Catholic bigiotry in Canada in less than a generation.

  2. Leland
    April 1st, 2011 at 17:41 | #2

    That is something I honestly did not know, Mont. Thanks for the information.

    So then this story actually illustrates what’s wrong with public education in general. That and the dangers of private institutions allowing themselves to become beholden to the government for financial support. (That’s one of the reasons Christians here in the USA are sometimes wary of their schools accepting vouchers from the government – even when they are available.)

    But could you explain something for us? You said “They exist because they agreed to abide by provincial rules and standards, in return for status and funding.” What status would they lose (in addition to the lost funding) if they decided to operate independently of government control?

  3. Leland
    April 1st, 2011 at 17:51 | #3

    “My Grandmother was horrified that they allowed Catholics to attend public school at all. But because they were public schools & she couldn’t afford private my Aunt Glady married a Catholic (twice). It was the state’s refusal to indulge her religious prejudice that ended anti-Catholic bigiotry in Canada in less than a generation.”

    Could you also tell us a little more about this? Was your Grandmother Catholic or anti-Catholic? Was it the state’s refusal to indulge her religious prejudice in particular that ended anti-Catholic bigotry in Canada? (Was she part of a landmark legal case or something?) Or just the state’s refusal to indulge religious prejudice in general? How bad was anti-Catholic bigotry in Canada before that?

  4. Mont D. Law
    April 1st, 2011 at 21:51 | #4

    My Grandmother was Scots/Irish and as Orange as they come. She believed the Pope was the anti-Christ and the Catholic church the tool and spawn of the devil. She believed they were ignorant, dirty savages, that had passels of children they couldn’t feed. After my Aunt married a Polish Catholic boy she went to public school with, my Grandmother stopped speaking to her. When my Aunt was widowed in the war, she married another Catholic and my Grandmother only relented when her Grandson was born. What my Father & his siblings got at home was overcome by their actual experience in public school, where everyone was treated the same way and rubber elbows all the time.

    How bad was anti-Catholic sentiment in Canada. Well Toronto still has an Orange Parade every year, though thankfully it is mostly spectacle now.

    The Orange Order or Lodge:

    [Irish immigrants established lodges in early Canadian settlement districts. Although authorities tried to proscribe them because of Orange–Catholic riots and violence, the lodges flourished, attracting farmers, labourers, timbermen, artisans, shopkeepers, and local leaders. In 1830 Ogle Gowan , an immigrant from Wexford, convened the first Grand Lodge of British America at Brockville. The Grand Lodge provided Gowan with a platform and a netit for organized political activity. That political base grew through Irish immigration, the enculturation of immigrants’ children, the acceptance of Orangeism by other Protestants in both rural and developing urban areas, and the deep anti-Catholic sentiment of Canadian Protestant society. The order became most prominent in Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Ontario, and the Prairies. It was at its height during the 1920s, and commenced serious decline in the 1950s.

    Read more: Orange Order – Protestant, William, Lodge, Political, Lodges, and Catholic http://www.jrank.org/history/pages/7810/Orange-Order.html#ixzz1IKy6n43k

    Gone by the 50′s When my Aunts and Uncles became adults taking the tolerance they learned in public schools with them, a gift from the state.

    It took another generation for Jews. Antisemitism was not as rife with violence, but there was still restricted country clubs in the city I was raised in until the 70′s. It was understood that Jews need not apply.

  5. Mont D. Law
    April 1st, 2011 at 22:14 | #5

    [“They exist because they agreed to abide by provincial rules and standards, in return for status and funding.”]

    You have to understand this happened a very long time ago, more then 150 years, when a public education was a worth a price is far above rubies. Deals were brokered and finally made in the province of Ontario, that established parallel public school systems, one public and one Catholic. The deal that gave status and the funding to Catholic schools allowed them to exist. If it had not gone this way, and in some provinces it didn’t, there would have only been public schools.

  6. Leland
    April 2nd, 2011 at 01:45 | #6

    @Mont D. Law
    Seriously? So parochial schools a can only exist in Canada at the pleasure of the government? In some provinces religious schools are not allowed? What about non-religious private schools? What’s the home-school situation in Canada?

  7. Leo
    April 2nd, 2011 at 08:54 | #7

    I am not a Canadian, and I am not a Catholic, but I understand the principle that if you take the king’s shilling, you do the king’s bidding.

    But is there something new here that breaks previous understandings in Canada? Were Catholic schools in Canada previously required (or are they currently required) to have Protestant, Islamic, or atheist clubs to make Catholic schools more welcoming to those views?

  8. Mont D. Law
    April 3rd, 2011 at 12:37 | #8

    [Were Catholic schools in Canada previously required (or are they currently required) to have Protestant, Islamic, or atheist clubs to make Catholic schools more welcoming to those views?]

    No, but since only Catholics go to Catholic schools other religions don’t come into it. However Catholic schools follow provincial standards in all non-religious areas. So, for example sex education, anti-racism and anti-bullying programs are the same at all provincial schools. Since gay is not a religious affiliation I suspect the government or failing that the courts will force the provincially funded Catholic schools to accept these clubs, the same way the gay kid was allowed to bring his date to the prom. Gay is not a religion and the law doesn’t protect religious distaste for gays the same as it doesn’t protect religious distaste for brown people, immigrants or single mothers.You can’t expel a kid from Catholic school if her parents are divorced, unmarried or gay. You can’t expel a child if he has sex, uses birth control or gets his girlfriend pregnant.

  9. Leo
    April 3rd, 2011 at 17:40 | #9

    “only Catholics go to Catholic schools”

    This is not true in the U.S. Is it true in Canada?

    What if a Catholic discovers he is really more inclined to atheism, Protestantism, or some other religion? Can he then demand a club to promote those views? Surely the laws of Canada prohibit religious discrimination based on a distaste for a particular religion.

    Are they any grounds on which someone can be expelled from a Catholic school in Canada?

    I can certainly see the downsides to Catholic education from taking government money. How do most Catholics in Canada feel about this?

  10. Mont D. Law
    April 3rd, 2011 at 21:12 | #10

    [This is not true in the U.S. Is it true in Canada?]

    In Canada only Catholics go to provincially funded Catholic schools.

    [What if a Catholic discovers he is really more inclined to atheism, Protestantism, or some other religion? Can he then demand a club to promote those views?]

    As far as I know this has never happened, so I don’t know. We don’t really have religious clubs in schools at this level, except for the rare generic Christian service clubs. It’s just not an issue.

    [Are they any grounds on which someone can be expelled from a Catholic school in Canada?]

    The same things that get you expelled from public school, nothing religiously based.

    [I can certainly see the downsides to Catholic education from taking government money. How do most Catholics in Canada feel about this?]

    As far as I know provincially funded Catholic schools are well attended anywhere they exist. That would seem to indicated Catholics like them.

  11. Leo
    April 4th, 2011 at 07:07 | #11

    You misunderstood my question. Let me restate it. How do Catholics feel about the problem posed in the start of the thread? That Catholic schools are well-attended doesn’t answer this question.

    I note that In 1999, the United Nations Human Rights Committee determined that Canada was in violation of article 26 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, because Ontario’s Ministry of Education discriminates against non-Catholics by continuing to publicly fund separate Catholic schools, but not those of any other religious groups.

  12. Mont D. Law
    April 4th, 2011 at 10:32 | #12

    [Seriously? So parochial schools a can only exist in Canada at the pleasure of the government? In some provinces religious schools are not allowed? What about non-religious private schools? What’s the home-school situation in Canada?]

    What you are missing is the idea of provincially funded Catholic schools, some provinces have what is called a “separate school system” of provincially funded Catholic schools and some provinces don’t. Private schools exist – Catholic and non-Catholic – you pay tuition and your kid can go but they are not provincially funded. We have quite a vibrant charter school system, which combines tuition & public funding, in a lot of places too and some home schooled kids.

  13. Chairm
    April 4th, 2011 at 10:48 | #13

    Monty said a falsehood:

    “Catholic schools in Ontario are not private schools. They exist because they agreed to abide by provincial rules and standards, in return for status and funding.”

    They are Catholic schools, nonetheless, and as such neither government funding nor status as a school can justify imposing anti-Catholic policies on Catholic schools.

  14. Mont D. Law
    April 4th, 2011 at 10:49 | #14

    [How do Catholics feel about the problem posed in the start of the thread?]

    I have no idea, my kid was in public school and is now 22. But Canadians is general seem happy with the education system private school enrollments are only about 6% across the whole country & less than 2% across the country home school. You would think both these numbers would be higher if there was deep unhappiness.

    [I note that In 1999, the United Nations Human Rights Committee determined that Canada was in violation of article 26 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, because Ontario’s Ministry of Education discriminates against non-Catholics by continuing to publicly fund separate Catholic schools, but not those of any other religious groups.]

    And I assume that no province that has Catholic schools (3 of 10) are going to change that anytime soon. They are very popular.

  15. Chairm
    April 4th, 2011 at 10:56 | #15

    Monty said:

    “only Catholics go to Catholic schools other religions don’t come into it.”

    False.

    Many people of other faiths, and some of no particular religion, have gone to Catholic schools across Canada and have done so because of the higher standard of morality that comes with the principled basis for Catholic education.

    The government did not force Catholic schools to grant special protection for anti-Catholic clubs within the Catholic school system. Not the way that gay identity politics is demanding for its special interest groups to be imposed against Catholic teaching in Catholic schools.

    And you are being dishonest when you speak of a supposed distaste for people with same-sex sexual attraciton; even when you speak of a supposed distaste for those who identify as members of the gay identity group.

    It is clear to me that you have a gaycentric view of all things upon which you comment. These aspoects of this issue are no exception.

  16. Chairm
    April 4th, 2011 at 10:59 | #16

    The history of Catholic schools in Canada is quite a bit more layered than Monty presents. Readers ought not to take Monty at his word since he is ill-informed on these matters. His gaycentric view distorts what little he has learned of Catholic schools in Canada.

  17. Mont D. Law
    April 4th, 2011 at 11:06 | #17

    [They are Catholic schools, nonetheless, and as such neither government funding nor status as a school can justify imposing anti-Catholic policies on Catholic schools.]

    The fact you don’t agree with something doesn’t make it blink out of existence or turn a true statement into a false one.

  18. Mont D. Law
    April 4th, 2011 at 11:48 | #18

    [Many people of other faiths, and some of no particular religion, have gone to Catholic schools across Canada and have done so because of the higher standard of morality that comes with the principled basis for Catholic education.]

    Private Catholic schools certainly, but not publicly funded Catholic schools. Here is what is required to enroll in Catholic school in Ontario.

    * an Ontario Health Card and record of immunization;
    * a report card from the student’s previous school (if applicable);
    * a birth certificate or other government document to show proof of age (for junior and senior kindergarten only);
    * and a Roman Catholic baptismal certificate for either the child OR parent *
    * the baptismal certificate of a common-law spouse or step-parent is also acceptable

    [The government did not force Catholic schools to grant special protection for anti-Catholic clubs within the Catholic school system. Not the way that gay identity politics is demanding for its special interest groups to be imposed against Catholic teaching in Catholic schools.]

    Apparently they didn’t have to. The Catholic school board that banned the GSA, rescinded it’s policy a week after they passed it. If it had made it to court the Catholic boards would have lost.

    “Following a barrage of international criticism, an Ontario Catholic school board has overturned its decision to ban gay-straight alliance groups, opting instead for a standardized equity policy until new inclusion measures can be put in place.”

    [It is clear to me that you have a gaycentric view of all things upon which you comment.]

    And it’s clear to me that an anti-gaycentric view of all things upon which you comment.

    So what.

  19. Mont D. Law
    April 4th, 2011 at 11:57 | #19

    [The history of Catholic schools in Canada is quite a bit more layered than Monty presents.]

    The layer it for us.

  20. Chairm
    April 4th, 2011 at 13:17 | #20

    Monty, the Catholic schools exist because they are Catholic schools, not because they are public schools. Imposing anti-Catholic policies on Catholic schools is unjustified, anyway, and that lack of justification sheds a harsh light on the falsehood you put forth.

  21. Chairm
    April 4th, 2011 at 13:28 | #21

    Monty, contrary to your listed items, non-Catholics may attend all Catholic schools in Canada. They cannot demand admittance, but they can be accomodated. And many, many, have been so accomodated.

    You offer this speculation: “If it had made it to court the Catholic boards would have lost.”

    That there is now, in Ontario, a priority placed by Government on the supremacy of gay identity politics is the issue we are discussing, Monty. You can applaud it, if you wish, but you still have yet to offer justification for imposing anti-Catholic policies on Catholic schools.

    Intimidation against Catholic Boards, and board members being intimidated into compliance, still does not justify the imposition. However, the report you cited indicated that the board members will formulate a policy with the prospect of a court challenge in mind.

    This illustrates the dangers and the threat to society that are coming to the fore just a few years after SSM was entrenched in Canada.

    Monty said: “So what?”

    You concede your gay emphasis upfront. That is good of you.

    I challenge you to justify your gaycentric view of all things upon which you comment. Be as forthright with that.

    On the other hand, I oppose the supremacy of identity politics — gaycentric or otherwise. Humankind has learned hard lessons on that score.

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